• Science Course Information

    Biology P
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: This course provides a general introduction to the major topics in Biology. Course topics include cell biology, Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, evolution, ecology and human biology.

    AP Biology
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing information explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging. Primary emphasis in an AP Biology course should be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Essential to this conceptual understanding are the following: a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to enviornmental and social conerns.

    *Students enrolled in this class are encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) exam. Exam scores, and each college/university, will determine eligibility for college credit.


    Chemistry P
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: This required course provides a general introduction to the major topics of chemistry. Topics covered include atomic and molecular theory, periodicity, chemical bonds of conservation of matter, stoichiometry, gases and their properties, acids and bases, solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium and nuclear processes. The exploration of chemical principles are included along with an introduction to organic chemistry.


    AP Chemistry
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: Students should attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. AP Chemistry should contribute to the development of the students' abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. The college course in general chemistry differs qulitatively from the usual first secondary school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and the variety of experiments done in the laboratory. Secondary schools that wish to offer an AP Chemistry course must be prepared to provide a laboratory experience equivalent to that of a typical college course.

    *Students enrolled in this class are encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) exam. Exam scores, and each college/university, will determine eligibility for college credit.


    Environmental Science 1 P A
    Meets UC/CSU "g"
    Description: This integrated course spans the fundamental principles of biology, chemistry, and physics. There is an emphasis on environmental chemistry. Topics include water chemistry, soil structure, chemistry of metal refining, petroleum chemistry and park and urban design. Off-campus field research trips and investigations are also a major poart of this course.

    Environmental Studies 1 P
    Meets UC/CSU "g"
    DescriptionStudents study combined course work in the natural and social sciences. This introductory course covers the ecological, political, and economic aspects of historic, current and future envrionmental plans.


    AP Environmental Science
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course. 1. Science is a process. 2. Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes. 3. The Earth itself is one interconnected system. 4. Humans alter natural systems. 5. Environmental problems have a cultural and social context. 6. Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

    *Students enrolled in this class are encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) exam. Exam scores, and each college/university, will determine eligibility for college credit.


    Physics P
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: This course covers fundamental principles governing the physical nature of our world. Topics may include the study of motion, Newtonian mechanics, conservation of momentum and energy, thermodynamics and heat, wave propagation, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear phsyics.


    Physiology P
    Meets UC/CSU "d", "g"
    Description: A detailed study of the functions of the human body that includes the study of cell structure and specialization, the skeletal system, muscles, nervous system, digestion, respirations, circulation, the skin, excretion, endorine system, reproduction, and heredity, including the latest information on the structure and function of DNA. There will be extensive lab work in animal dissection and microscopic investigation.
Last Modified on September 17, 2015