• Summit

     

    Summit Schedule:

     

    11:00 Registration & Lunch

     

    11:30-12:30 Opening 

    • Welcome & Student Testimonial

    • Honoring the Land & Acknowledging Our Racist Histories

    • Getting Clear About Definitions

     

    12:30-2:30pm Workshops:

    • An Introduction to Racial Justice, Equity & Healing: How White Supremacy Shows Up In our Schools

    • We All Have Bias: The Brain, How We See Our Students & Impacts in the Classroom

    • How To Be an Antiracist Educator in Oakland: Tools, Practices & Structures

    • How Racism in Schools Traumatizes Our Students: Building Relationship-Centered Schools

     

    2:30-3pm Closing in Workshops

    • Being Allies in Solidarity With Each Other

      • One-on-One Reflections

      • Visioning, Commitments & Closing

     

    CORE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS OFFERED by the RJEH TASKFORCE:

     

    An Introduction to Racial Justice, Equity & Healing: How does White Supremacy show up in schools?

     

    Facilitators: Raquel Jimenez, Equity; Peter Van Tassel, Cleveland Elementary 

     

    We will build a common understanding of our shared legacy of oppression, white supremacy and its impact on our thinking, actions, and work as anti-racist educators.

      

    How To Be an Antiracist Educator in Oakland: Tools, Practices & Structures

     

    Facilitators: Diane Lang, Manzanita SEED; Teacher Recruitment & Retention Team

     

    This workshop is for educators who are developing their critical consciousness intending to identify the ways in which racism and colonialism marginalize students and families. This workshop is to explore the practices and policies that perpetuate systemic inequity in your classroom. Then develop strategies to interrupt racist practices within your sphere of influence.

     

    How Racism in Schools Traumatizes Our Students: Building Relationship-Centered Schools

     

    Facilitators: Californians for Justice; Urana Jackson, Behavioral Health; Heather Manchester, Restorative Justice

     

    Often when the subject of trauma is presented, the link between trauma and racism is hardly explored. It becomes apparent through understanding this link why relationships and creating culturally responsive spaces are a fundamental feature for student success and well-being. Participants in this workshop will have an opportunity to self reflect and explore practices needed to help students to feel safe, empowered and supported in our schools. In addition, OUSD students will share their personal experiences of why and how we need to foster culturally responsive spaces. Californians for Justice will introduce deep (constructivist) listening tools to learn some best practices for interrupting bias and engage in self- reflection practices to improve relationships and achievement.

     

    We All Have Bias: The Brain & Impacts on Student Achievement

     

    Facilitators: Lailan Huen, Equity & API Student Achievement; Barb McClung, Behavioral Health

     

    To ensure that all students succeed in Oakland and to implement equity in the classroom, participants will build their capacity for racial literacy and will engage in an exploration of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Reflecting on how our experiences and associations can influence our efficacy as educators, participants will explore self-reflection and curriculum tools that promote racial equity and justice in our schools.

     

    Culturally Responsive Schools: Best Practices in OUSD

     

    Facilitators: Lailan Huen, Equity & API Student Achievement; OUSD Teachers & Students

     

    This workshop dives into some of the key tenets of Culturally Responsive Education, and what that means for Oakland’s diverse students. We will share existing best practice examples in our school district to share resources, inspire your practice, and ground ourselves in Oakland and OUSD’s context while lifting up student and teacher voices.  We’ll have opportunities to dialogue, reflect and generate ideas with colleagues to plan what culturally responsive practices can look like during distance learning and this school year.