• ELA Current Readings

    6th Grade Reading

     

    Percy Jackson - Lightning Thief

    Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief 

    About the Book 

    Hero Percy Jackson has trouble studying and reading because of his dyslexia. He keeps getting into trouble, and is expelled from each school he attends. He has to go from boarding school

    to boarding school because nobody wants him.

     

    Percy lives with his mother and stepfather, but doesn’t know who his real father is. Percy and the other students go on a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There one of the teachers undergoes some pretty appalling changes and attacks our hero for no apparent reason. Percy is able to defend himself, but the teacher disappears. For some reason none of the other students on the trip remember the teacher ever being there.

     

    Percy eventually learns that the master lightning bolt of Zeus was stolen and the gods believe that Percy is the thief. Percy must undertake a dangerous trek with a couple other students to clear himself and find the missing lighting bolt, and all must be done within ten days. He learns much about himself, his dyslexia, his abilities and his ancestry in the process.



    7th Grade Reading

    A Long Walk

    A Long Walk to Water: based on a true story

     About the Book

    A Long Walk to Water is based on the true story of Salva, one of some 3,800 Sudanese "Lost Boys" airlifted to the United States beginning in the mid 1990s.

     

    Before leaving Africa, Salva's life is one of harrowing tragedy. Separated from his family by war and forced to travel on foot through hundreds of miles of hostile territory, he survives starvation, animal attacks, and disease, and ultimately leads a group of about 150 boys to safety in Kenya. Relocated to upstate New York, Salva resourcefully learns English and continues on to college. Eventually he returns to his home region in southern Sudan to establish a foundation that installs deep-water wells in remote villages in dire need of clean water. This poignant story of Salva's life is told side-by-side with the story of Nya, a young girl who lives today in one of those villages.




    8th Grade Reading


    Inside Out

    About the Book

    Inside Out and Back Again is a New York Times bestseller, a Newbery Honor Book, and a winner of the National Book Award! Inspired by the author's childhood experience of fleeing Vietnam after the Fall of Saigon and immigrating to Alabama, this coming-of-age debut novel told in verse has been celebrated for its touching child's-eye view of family and immigration.

     

    For all the ten years of her life, Hà has only known Saigon: the thrills of its markets, the joy of its traditions, and the warmth of her friends close by. But now the Vietnam War has reached her home. Hà and her family are forced to flee as Saigon falls, and they board a ship headed toward hope. In America, Hà discovers the foreign world of Alabama: the coldness of its strangers, the dullness of its food . . . and the strength of her very own family.

     

    This moving story of one girl's year of change, dreams, grief, and healing received four starred reviews, including one from Kirkus which proclaimed it "enlightening, poignant, and unexpectedly funny." An author's note explains how and why Thanhha Lai translated her personal experiences into Hà's story.



    Coming Up . . .

     

    6th Grade Reading

     

    Bud Not

    About the Book

     

    It's 1936, in Flint, Michigan. Ten-year-old Bud may be a motherless boy on the run, but he's on a mission. His momma never told him who his father was, but she left a clue: posters of Herman E. Calloway and his famous band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression! Bud's got an idea that those posters will lead to his father. Once he decides to hit the road and find this mystery man, nothing can stop him. Bud, Not Buddy is full of laugh-out-loud humor and wonderful characters, hitting the high notes of jazz and sounding the deeper tones of the Great Depression.



    7th grade Reading

    Luyddie  

    About the Book

    She was no better than a slave, Lyddie thought. The dept-ridden farm had been let to neighbor, and she and her brother had been hired out. Was the end really near, as their mother had said when she fled with the babies after the hungry bear had broken into their Vermont farm house? That winter of 1843, the two children had been left to fend for themselves. If their long-gone father would return and set things right. It is the promise of a new and better life that finally prompts Lyddie to journey to the mill town of Lowell, Massachusetts. As a factory girl, she will earn a wage—and be free. No matter that she has to live in a crowded boarding house, that the clatter of incessant looms is deafening, that the murky lint-filled air brings on fevers and wracking coughs. Despite the menacing overseer, Lyddie works long, exhausting hours to be able to pay off the debt and regain her beloved farm.




    8th Grade Reading

    To Kill

    About the Book

    Scout Finch lives with her brother, Jem, and their widowed father, Atticus, in the sleepy Alabama town of Maycomb. Maycomb is suffering through the Great Depression, but Atticus is a prominent lawyer and the Finch family is reasonably well off in comparison to the rest of society.  Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, you learn about her father Atticus Finch, an attorney who hopelessly strives to prove the innocence of a black man unjustly accused of rape; and about Boo Radley, a mysterious neighbor who saves Scout and her brother Jem from being killed.










Last Modified on February 11, 2017