• Funding Information

     

    Funding

     

Funding Announcements

  • Public Notice: Intent to Apply for 21st Century High School ASSETS funding

    Public Notice: Intent to Apply for 21st Century High School ASSETS funding

    OUSD hereby notifies the local community that we intend to apply for 21st Century High School ASSETS funding through the California Department of Education’s Cohort 12 grant application process. We are applying for 21st Century High School ASSETs funding for Coliseum College Prep Academy, McClymonds High School, and Skyline High School. Our applications are due to the California Department of Education by November 13, 2018. We also take this opportunity to inform private schools of our intent to provide safe, accessible academic support and enrichment programs in the aforementioned schools both after school and during the summer. Parties interested in participating in our proposal are asked to contact Martha Peňa, After School Program Coordinator, at Martha.pena@ousd.org or 510-879-2885.

    Comments (-1)

Current Funding

  •  

    California Department of Education

     

    OUSD After School Programs are funded through grants from the California Department of Education (CDE).

    CDE provides funds to school districts that collaborate with community partners to provide safe and educationally enriching alternatives for children and youths during non school hours. The funds are awarded to specific school sites as part of a competitive process. OUSD directly applies for these grant funds from the California Department of Education, and grant funds are received and managed by the school district. OUSD contracts a portion of grant funds to Lead Agencies to operate after school programs in close partnership with schools. 

     

    The base grants that CDE awards to OUSD for after school programs represent three funding sources:

     

    • After School Education & Safety (ASES) for elementary, middle, and K-8 schools are state funds.  ASES grants are three year renewable funding sources.
    • 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) grants for elementary, middle, and K-8 schools are federal funds.  21st CCLC grants are awarded based on a highly competitive application process, and grants last for five years.
    • 21st Century After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETS) grants for high schools are federal funds awarded based on a highly competitive application process, and grants last for five years.

     

    ASES grant goals – programs provide children and youth with safe and educationally enriching alternatives during non-school hours, including literacy, academic enrichment, and safe constructive alternatives.

     

    21st CCLC and ASSETS grant goals – These programs are intended to:

    • Improve academic achievement
    • Provide enrichment services that reinforce and complement the academic program and;
    • Provide family literacy and related education development services

     

    Oakland Fund for Children and Youth Funding

     

    In addition to state grant funds, the City of Oakland’s Oakland Fund for Children and Youth school-based after school grants have provided local match dollars for most elementary and middle school after school programs in OUSD. OUSD After School Lead Agency partners submit competitive grant applications to OFCY on behalf of OUSD after school programs to secure this match funding. OFCY OUSD After School Programs have engaged in partnership with the OFCY since 2004.

     

    OFCY grant goals – OFCY’s goals for school-based after school are:

     

    • Youth have increased connectivity with the school, peers and adults
    • Youth have increased sense of mastery and accomplishment of new skills
    • Youth have increased self-esteem
    • Youth have improved communication and social skills
    • Increased family engagement in school and afterschool activities

     

    The outcomes that OFCY encourages its school-based after school grantees to achieve are:

     

    • Improved rates of Oakland children reading at grade level
    • Improved student attendance rates and decreased rates of chronic absenteeism
    • Improved academic performance
    • Improved rates of physical fitness and education on healthier lifestyles